Historic Crime Statistics for the Supper Rock Neighborhood Area


Statistics are provided by the Albuquerque Police Department's Crime Reporting function, which classifies crime according to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) guidelines.   This UCR Program provides a nationwide view of crime based on submission of uniform crime statistics by local law enforcement agencies throughout the country.

FAQs - Frequently Asked Questions:
Q:  Do we have much reported vandalism in our neighborhood?
A:  Larceny (theft) and vandalism are the two most common crimes in the Supper Rock Neighborhood areas. 
For example, during just the latter half of October 2005, in Parkside Estates alone there occurred one home broken into, a car stolen, another attempted theft of a car, and a third car whose windows were broken and tires deflated.  Neighborhood watch called the Foothills sub-station requesting extra patrols during the night.

Q:  When can a "regular citizen" call the Foothills Substation?
A:  If you need to call the police, you can do so 24 hours a day.  The contact information is here.

Q:  How can I obtain the latest crime statistics for my neighborhood?
A:   You can generate (and print) a current
(as of  last week day) PDF file summary of Supper Rock's (or any Albuquerque neighborhood) Crime Statistics from the city's Crime Statistics and Crime Map, as linked from our Police page. The reporting system changed as of the year 2000, as explained on the site.


Q:  What do "Part I" and "Part II" Crimes mean?
A:  Part I refers to the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting of eight (8) specific crimes:  murder and non-negligent manslaughter, robbery, aggravated assault, rape, motor vehicle theft, larceny, burglary, and arson. If the table below doesn't list a category (e.g., murder), it is because SRNA has zero numbers for all years shown. 
Part II crimes are everything other than Part I.

Q:  What about criminals?  How can I determine if, for example, a convicted sex offender is living in my neighborhood?
A:  Registration of offenders is handled by the state, not by APD. 
See this New Mexico web site.
 

Q:  What is the recent history of crime within the Supper Rock Neighborhood area?
A:  The following table summarizes crime statistics for SRNA since the start of calendar year 2000:
 Calendar Year:
2000 2001 2002 2003
2004
2005
(thru 14 Dec.)
2006
(not yet avail.)
Part I Crimes
Aggravated Assault 10 14 9
10
9
12

Arson
0
0
1
1
1
1

Burglary 22 30 18
17
20
19

Larceny (see definition at end of page) 130 223 176
89
51
66

Motor Vehicle Theft 22 25 25
14
13
5

Rape
1
4
0
0
0
0

Robbery 6 2 2
6
4
5

Part II Crimes
Bribery 0 0
0
0
1

Counterfeiting/Forgery 0 0
11
0
6

Destruction/Damage/Vandalism
of property
65 46 44
42
17
33

Disorderly Conduct 10 13 11
12
0
10

Driving Under the Influence 3  8 10
5
3
3

Embezzlement 3  1 2
5
0
3

Family Offenses, non-violent 55 50 49
66
17
45

Fraud 5 14 18
11
1
16

Intimidation 8 5 5
8
4
6

Kidnapping 0 1
2
1
0

Liquor Law Violations 3 7 9
5
1
0

Narcotics offenses 7 15 8
7
9
6

Runaway (not a crime) 5 2 3
6
0
3

Sex Offenses, forcible 0 1
2
2
0

Sex Offenses, non-forcible
0
0
0
1
0
0

Simple assault 25 31 28
49
10
19

Stolen Property Offenses 2
5 4
2
3
2

Traffic offense 31 39 107
48
19
28

Trespass of real property 3 19 20
2
3
4

Weapons law violations 3 0 3
2
1
2

All other offenses
102
119
115
100
41
83

Crime
521
680
669
523
206
378


How offenses are categorized under the FBI 's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) system, in which APD participates:  

A14. The Hierarchy Rule states: In a multiple-offense situation (i.e., one where several offenses are committed at the same time and place), after classifying all Part I offenses, score only the highest ranking offense, and ignore all others, regardless of the number of offenders and victims. (UCR Handbook, Pg. 33)

Example:
Incident: During the commission of an armed bank robbery, the offender strikes a teller with the butt of a handgun. The robber runs from the bank and steals an automobile at curb side.
Classification: Robbery, Aggravated Assault, and Motor Vehicle Theft are three Part I offenses apparent in this situation. Each of these offenses appears on the report listed in a certain order, and of these three crimes, Robbery is the "highest" on the list. Therefore, this incident would be classified as Robbery, and, accordingly, one offense would be scored. All of the other offenses would be ignored. (UCR Handbook, Pg. 33)

For other examples of how the crimes are counted, visit this FBI web site.

Definitions:
Larceny is sometimes called Theft.  The definition:
Larceny (or Theft): the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. Pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shoplifting, thefts from motor vehicles, thefts of motor vehicle parts and accessories, bicycle thefts, thefts from buildings, and thefts not specifically classified are included in this category. Theft does not include motor vehicle theft, embezzlement, fraud, and forgery.
For other select UCR definitions, visit this St. Paul Police Department web site.

Last modified:  15 February 2006